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20130121
20130129
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CSPAN 29
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English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
. that he also spoke up boldly for equality, human rights, civil rights for all americans. i remember he said, and you may recall, too, mr. speaker, he said, he said, we will never forget, you know, stonewall, cynical falls and selma. these are three iconic moments in civil rights history when he talked about the women's right movement, gay rights movement and african-american movements for civilritis. but they ale added up to one thing which is that an american is an american is an american, doesn't matter what your color is, what your sex is, who you love and want to be with, what matters are that you are an american and entitled to the full protection of the law in these united states. i think it was very important for him to do so. it represented an evolutionary moment in american mystery that a president, being nag rated into his second term, -- being inaugurated into his second term, would stand up and say civil and human rights for all people. i thought it was a great moment and found myself cheering even though i hadn't planned on doing so. but he didn't stop there. he specifical
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
? >> a lot. since 1981, really. i was a civil rights attorney. i dealt with gender discrimination. a disability rights law had just come into law not long before i had joined. that was very good experience that led to my next government job with bob dole, 1981. turned republicans. . at the top of the list was the boldest -- voters rights. he wanted to make sure he was a player. it was a good fit. >> did you agree with him in most things? >> i did. people tend to identify me with the progressive camp. i hate labels. i thave taken strong stances. i am a conservative in one sense. i believe in capitalism but believe that system has to the police and regulated. britain has to be policed and regulated. it is popular. i think it is one that was reflective of post paul -- both politics. the tax reform act. i enabled it to be lower for everyone. the compromise that fixed social security for years. a benefit to cut and tax increases. that was bipartisan leadership that we needed and had. his service to our country and the terrible wounds he suffered gave him a tremendous strength. he under
in your "usa today" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil libert
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
, they remember the fight and struggle led by martin luther king and other people during the civil rights era to break through america's history of racism, of segregation, of people being marginalized. king lead to a lot of what we know now as historic legislation, the civil rights act, the voting rights act, the fair housing act. so there is a legacy that king left the benefit it and created the conditions under which president obama could even be elected to you do not have the voting rights act, you do not have black elected officials did you do not have the black vote -- a voting turnout that ultimately becomes critical in the 1990's, 2000, and of course in 2008, even in 2012. there is a long legacy. president obama himself acknowledges that he stands on those shoulders. not just the shoulders of former presidents that he talks about, but also the civil rights leaders. so it is significant that this is being held on martin luther king's holiday. and, of course, he is the president that is there when the martin luther king memorial actually comes about and is put up here in washington, d.c.
with seneca falls and selma. these are all iconic moments in a series of civil rights movements. and they deserve to be listed together but are not always. so this was an amazing moment. you could hear the cheers from the people on the mall in the background. this is not just me talking. there was wide approval in the crowd, because the cheers were very loud. host: 1 happened at the stonewall inn? guest: stone wall is a gay bar in new york city. 1960's, policend raids were very common at gay bars throughout the united states, including in places like new york city. it may surprise people to know how common that was in the late 1960's. so there was a police raid on the stonewall inn, but this time instead of acquiescence by the patrons, people get arrested, people leave, this time people fought back. it
time ago. it was 1967. and i remember very well senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill in 1968 was passed. i discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do. but there was a time when senator baker said he was in everett dirksen's office, the man who had the job senator mcconnell now has. he was the republican leader then. he said he heard the telephone ring and heard only one end of the conversation, but senator dirksen was saying, no, mr. president, i cannot come down and have a drink with you tonight. i did that last night and louella is very unhappy with me. and that was the conversation. about 30 minutes later there was a rustle out in the outer office, the office senator mcconnell holds, and two beagles came in and lyndon johnson, the president, said to the republican leader, everett, if you don't have a drink wh me, i'm down here to have one with you and the disperiod for 45 -- and they disappeared for 45 minutes. the point of that is it was in that very office, the republican leader's office in 1968, the next year
on to dave, a republican in indiana. caller: hello, c-span. you talk about rights. civil rights, gay rights, and all that. what about the rights of the unborn? don't they have any rights in this country anymore? second, if he is so wanting to come to either do what is right for the country, why does he go outside and do executive orders when he does not get his way? host: we're talking about president obama's second inaugural address. if you missed any part of it yesterday, go to our website c- span.org and watch it there. we covered it throughout the day including the speech, congressional luncheon, and the parade. all of that on c-span.org. gary on twitter says -- host: terry, republican in north carolina. caller: hello, i would like to see obama start his second term off a little bit better. i would like to hold c-span to what they were supposed to do on his first term. quit having the meetings behind closed doors but you guys are supposed to have the cameras in the room. host: we would have cameras in the room if it was allowed. caller: well, you see, that is what he promised last time.
. housing, they are discriminated against. a lot is almost a civil rights issue. it is a human rights issue. i am hoping integration helps that. families are torn apart by it. i am fortunate to have had a very fortunate family. the stress and strain economically will bust up families. you are right on it. think -- thank you for your acknowledgement. >> i think it is interesting families would not hesitate to get a family matter cannot -- family member help for appendicitis or any other problem but often have a difficult time reaching out to get the behavioral health and the substance seized disorder treatment they need. the bottom line is it is often seen that you have a character problem or a bad mom or dad or something along those lines, rather than, for many people, if they have a brain disease. there is a lot of education still to come and a lot of support we need at several levels for people to be able to move forward and raise their hand and come out and get help. i can also say we need to stick our head up and be proud of the fact that the area of health care we provide care in and w
passage of the historic civil rights laws. we are honored to have with us a colleague, congressman john lewis, a speaker at that historic march. [applause] ongressman lewis' life exemplifies the courage and sacrifice that has made our nation great. please stand and take about what so we can all recognize you. [applause] -- take a bow so that we can all srecognize you. behind us, the painting we have chosen for this luncheon is at niagara falls. 6.is was painted in 1850 sike for me, niagara falls never fails to inspire a tremendous all of the natural beauty of our country. then and now, the mighty falls symbolize the grandeur, power, and possibility of america. i want to thank my former senate partner, hillary clinton for allowing us to borrow this beautiful painting from the state department collection. [applause] but frankly, we are not here for the paintings, we are here for the food. while the theme of today's ceremony is based in america's future, today's menu could be labeled face in america's food. from the new england lobster, to the south dakota bison, to the wonderful new york
to stonewall in such a clear and simple phrase he captured the struggle of some many of us, the civil rights challenge of so many of us. we need to engage in the conversation. host: what do you expect from the congress in this area? guest: much has happened in the congress. out efforts were mostly about blocking bad things from happening. we did that in the early 2000's. i see parallels with reducing gun violence with marriage equality and support for the gay and lesbian community. we see support from republicans for marriage equality and support from democrats. continued efforts to pass the respect for marriage act, which would get rid of the defense for marriage act. i see the courts -- the supreme court is taking up marriage equality. they will be heard in march with a decision heard in june. there has been a shift in public attitudes, just as i see a shift on reducing gun violence. host: good morning. caller: i watch the news a lot and i see the shootings and the mass shootings are committed by the mentally ill. i have a son and i see this and my son. no gun control law would control him
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't build that, you didn't build that small business." that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on it because that was a slog
close to the public hospital. on the 50th anniversary of the 50th -- on 50 the anniversary of the civil rights act. -- on the anniversary of thcivil rights act. on a closing note, just a report came out that the state about alma -- of alabama has revised -- if you just paid an expert -- if you would just play an exit of the governor. guest: a couple of things he mentioned. one is the challenge that local governments have. when you look ahead, now the state to coming out of the recession, one of the things they are still dealing with our problems at the local level. states often have to step in when local governments have financial problems. in pennsylvania, michigan, rhode island, the problems of local governments are the problems of state officials. host: we have not heard yet from the governor of alabama for the state of state address that will be coming in a couple of weeks. caller: as we all know, big money from a deep pocket contributors really controls the congress in washington. whether it is the republican house or democratic senate. in my opinion it also controls the white hous
time is to put the past behind us. let's march arm in arm with the new civil rights movement to say that we as a nation can all stand for the beautiful gift of life. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. i send to the desk a privileged report from the committee on rules for filing under the rule. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title. the clerk: report to accompany house resolution 39, resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 325, to ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the united states government until may 19, 2013, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. sessions: mr. speaker, i move that the house do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands it's just --
-- a greater embrace of economic freedom as well as civil rights and we will continue to do that. and we will also do it in a way that focuses on the president's primary responsibility when it comes to foreign policy which is the safety and security of the united states and the american people. >> do you have a reaction to congressman paul ryan saying that the president needs a strongman argument in his inaugural address when he talked about the fact that the united states is not a nation of takers. congressman ryan said that the president misconstrued what he meant, what ryan meant when he used that term? a nation of takers? >> the president mentioned chairman ryan, but i mean, that phrase has been used by a number of republicans including paul ryan. the president's point was that these programs, social security and medicare in particular, have been enormously valuable to seniors in our country and to providing the security that has allowed for stronger economic growth and stronger job creation and a stronger middle class. i mean, the facts and figures on what the plight of the -- polit
your great process is being made in improving the rights of -- many are on low income. currently they are not -- would ask a civil service to investigate this pattern to make sure that assistance with energy efficiencies available to everybody who really needs at? >> well, look very carefully at what my right honorable friend says but i think this government has taken some steps forward in terms of the rights of our components. i have some of these in mywn constituency and how important it is that we get a balance of log ride. specifically her point on the greendale i will look at that because the greenfield very important measure to try to help people with the energy efficiency and keep their bills do. we wanted to be able to as as many people as possible. >> yesterday, the medical director of nhs told the public accounts committee that gp's were imposing unjuified restrictions on cataract operation. it seems the prime minister and his re- organization is taking the nhs back to the 1980s, when it was, when nhs was -- we take this opportunity to apologize to ugly people who are w
washington journal." >> one of the key themes for any exhibition on the civil war of the twin issues of abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate they came of age when they did because between the two of them, they make issues around emancipation and abolition, issues around human rights and the american freedom on a general not raise specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson puts it to this picture. i will summarize by saying if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, there is a letter going from the bedroom window up to the big wink and as if there is a way in and out without being seen. there is a rooster up here. roosters have a habit of finding a purge and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the slave is on top of the slave -- the head is on top of the slave quarters. if you look at the white girl in the backyard with a black girl checking if the coast is clear, some say, she is coming to hear the music. she is the mistress or the master's daughter. she is not here to hear the music. nobody is paying attention
'sritis around the world, en-- women's rights around the world, engaging in civil society and restoring and maintaining american influence in a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next conscious over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we pass an authorization bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here at i guess our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources, we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we'd get you to come back again. i realize that would be grats i, you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time and do the hearing that i'd like to have. which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depend on
graduation rates. be right back. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> one of the key things for an exhibition on the civil war are the twin issues of abolition and emancipation. but we are fortunate that they came of age when they did. between the two of them, they make issues around emancipation and abolition, human-rights and american freedom on a general, not raise specific level. -- non-race specific level. if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, but you will get is a white cat slinking in one window. there is a letter going up to the bedroom. ladder going up to the bedroom. there is a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evenings of finding a perch and calling to the hand to spend the night with them. -- hen to spend the night with them. if you start adding up although little is an ounce and build the down here at the white girl answering the backyard with the black woman checking to make sure the coast is clear, some viewers have said, she is coming to hear the music. she is
to enforce sanctions on iran, your work supporting women's rights are around the world, and teaching with civil society and maintaining american influence in a difficult era. i would have thought the last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next four years and beyond. instead our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans did not provide you with resources, the administration inside the state department. i would hope maybe we get you to come back again. i realize that would -- he would not be on the government table at that time. getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the whole country. this is all a discussion about that might have been five security people on the ground. if only there had been more funding, this cable, that cable. much of the to more protection, might have led to more casualties. -- might have lead to more protection, might have led to
exhibition on the civil war is abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate that those men came of age when they did. they make issues around the emancipation and abolition issues around human rights and american freedom on a general non-race specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson was in this paper -- picture. if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, you will get a dark skinned black woman holding a white child. there is a ladder and a bolt of fabric coming out the other window. there is a rooster appear. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and call into the hands to spend the night with him. the hen is on top of the slate orders. if you add all of the inns and outs and look down here at the white girl answering the backyard -- entering the back yard, some of you have said she is coming to hear the music, she is the mistress. she is not here to see the music. no one is paying attention to her. is she a product of one of those liaisons? >> the civil war and its influence on american artist. part of american histor
to introduce civil rights leader merlie evers, who will lead us in the invocation. [applause] >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january 21, 2013. the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders. the president, vice-president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces, blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream, the opportunity to become what ever are mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meeting that everyone is included. made the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and a hi
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)